Acute Myeloid Leukemia

Acute Myeloid Leukemia

Acute myelogenous leukemia (AML) is a cancer of the blood and bone marrow — the spongy tissue inside bones where blood cells are made. The word “acute” in acute myelogenous leukemia denotes the disease’s rapid progression.

A type of cancer of the blood and bone marrow with excess immature white blood cells.
AML progresses rapidly, with myeloid cells interfering with the production of normal white blood cells, red blood cells and platelets.
Symptoms include fatigue, fever, recurrent infections and bruising of the body easily.
Treatments include chemotherapy, other drug therapy and stem-cell transplants.

What is survival rate for AML?
The 5-year survival rate tells you what percent of people live at least 5 years after the cancer is found. Percent means how many out of 100. The 5-year survival rate for people 20 and older with AML is about 25%. For people younger than 20, the survival rate is 67%.

Are there stages of acute myeloid leukemia?
The extent or spread of cancer is usually described as stages. In adult acute myeloid leukemia (AML), the subtype of AML and whether the leukemia has spread outside the blood and bone marrow are used instead of the stage to plan treatment.

How long can you live with AML without treatment?
Overall survival for AML

Without treatment, survival is usually measured in days to weeks. With current treatment regimens, 65%–70% of people with AML reach a complete remission (which means that leukemia cells cannot be seen in the bone marrow) after induction therapy.

Is Acute leukemia is curable?
Acute leukemias can often be cured with treatment. Chronic leukemias are unlikely to be cured with treatment, but treatments are often able to control the cancer and manage symptoms. Some people with chronic leukemia may be candidates for stem cell transplantation, which does offer a chance for cure.

Does anyone survive AML?
The five-year overall survival rate for AML is 27.4 percent, according to the National Cancer Institute (NCI). This means that of the tens of thousands of Americans living with AML, an estimated 27.4 percent are still living five years after their diagnosis.

Why do AML patients die?
Death in patients with AML may result from uncontrolled infection or hemorrhage. This may happen even after use of appropriate blood product and antibiotic support.

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