Aortic Aneurysm

Aortic Aneurysm
An aortic aneurysm is an enlargement (dilatation) of the aorta to greater than 1.5 times normal size. They usually cause no symptoms except when ruptured. Occasionally, there may be abdominal, back, or leg pain. They are most commonly located in the abdominal aorta, but can also be located in the thoracic aorta.
Can you survive an aortic aneurysm?
An AAA doesn’t usually pose a serious threat to health, but there’s a risk that a larger aneurysm could burst (rupture). A ruptured aneurysm can cause massive internal bleeding, which is usually fatal. Around 8 out of 10 people with a rupture either die before they reach hospital or don’t survive surgery.
How serious is an aortic aneurysm?
The potential for rupture is the most serious risk associated with an aortic aneurysm. A ruptured aortic aneurysm can cause life-threatening internal bleeding and/or a stroke. According to the Society of Thoracic Surgeons, approximately 15,000 people die each year from a ruptured aortic aneurysm
Symptoms of rupture include:
  • Pain in the abdomen or back. The pain may be severe, sudden, persistent, or constant. It may spread to the groin, buttocks, or legs.
  • Passing out.
  • Clammy skin.
  • Dizziness.
  • Nausea and vomiting.
  • Rapid heart rate.
  • Shock.

What foods to avoid if you have aortic aneurysm?
Reduce the amount of sodium and cholesterol in your diet. And eat lean meats, lots of fruits and vegetables, and whole grains. Avoid strenuous activities. Things like shoveling snow, chopping wood, and lifting heavy weights can actually put strain on an existing aneurysm.

How long can u live with an aortic aneurysm?
Patients with AAAs larger than 7.0 cm lived a median of 9 months. A ruptured aneurysm was certified as a cause of death in 36% of the patients with an AAA of 5.5 to 5.9 cm, in 50% of the patients with an AAA of 6 to 7.0 cm, and 55% of the patients with an AAA larger than 7.0 cm.

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