Atrial Fibrillation

Atrial Fibrillation
An irregular, often rapid heart rate that commonly causes poor blood flow.
The heart’s upper chambers (atria) beat out of coordination with the lower chambers (ventricles).
This condition may have no symptoms, but when symptoms do appear they include palpitations, shortness of breath and fatigue.
Treatments include drugs, electrical shock (cardioversion) and minimally invasive surgery (ablation).
Atrial fibrillation is an irregular and often rapid heart rate that occurs when the two upper chambers of your heart experience chaotic electrical signals. The result is a fast and irregular heart rhythm. The heart rate in atrial fibrillation may range from 100 to 175 beats a minute.
Ask your doctor about these foods to avoid with atrial fibrillation and afib medications.
  • AlcoholAlcohol tops the list of items to avoid on an atrial fibrillation diet.
  • Caffeine.
  • Grapefruit.
  • Cranberry Juice.
  • Asparagus and Leafy Green Vegetables.
  • Processed and Salty Foods.
  • Gluten.

What happens during atrial fibrillation?
In atrial fibrillation, the upper chambers of the heart (the atria) beat irregularly (quiver) instead of beating effectively to move blood into the ventricles. If a clot breaks off, enters the bloodstream and lodges in an artery leading to the brain, a stroke results.

How serious is atrial fibrillation?
Atrial fibrillation isn’t usually life-threatening or considered serious in people who are otherwise healthy. However, atrial fibrillation can be dangerous if you have diabetes, high blood pressure or other diseases of the heart. Either way, this condition needs to be properly diagnosed and managed by a doctor.

Instagram

Instagram has returned invalid data.

Archives