STRESS

STRESS

Stress is how the mind and body respond to any pressure. Stress is the body’s respond to any change that requires an adjustment or response. The body behaves to these changes with physical, mental, and emotional responses. Stress is a simple part of life. You can experience stress from your surroundings, your body, and your thoughts. There are various types of stress—all of which carry physical and mental health problems. Stress is a natural physical and mental response to life experiences. Everyone feels stress from time to time. Anything from daily responsibilities like work and family to serious life events such as a new diagnosis, war, or the death of a loved one can trigger stress. The stress response is the body’s way of defend you. When working properly, it helps you stay energetic, concentrated and alert. In difficult situations, stress can protect your life—giving you extra strength to defend yourself. Stress can also help you rise to face challenges. It keeps you on your toes during a presentation at work, sharpens your concentration when you’re drives to study for an exam. But beyond a certain point, stress cease being helpful and began causing major problems to your health, mood, productivity, relationships, and your quality of life. The most harm thing about stress is how simply it can creep up on you. You get used to it. It starts to feel normal. You don’t aware how much it’s affecting you, even as it takes a heavy toll. Stress symptoms may be affecting your health, even though you might not feel or notice it. You may think illness is responsible for that irritating headache, your frequent insomnia or your lower productivity at work. Stress symptoms can infect your body, your thoughts and feelings, and your behavior. Stress can create a variety of symptoms and infect your overall well-being. Symptoms of stress include: irritability, anxiety, depression, headaches and insomnia. Stress that’s left unchecked can contribute too many health issues; they are high blood pressure, heart disease, obesity and diabetes. Stress can hit your health. Stress also becomes dangerous when people occupy in the compulsive use of substances or behaviors to try to relieve their stress. These substances or behaviors include alcohol, tobacco, drugs, gambling, sex and the Internet. Rather than ease the stress and returning the body to an ease state, these substances and compulsive behaviors tend to keep the body in a stressed state and cause more health problems. The distressed individual becomes trapped in a dangerous circle. It is important to pay attention to how you deal with high or low stressors. There are some ways that you can improve ability to handle stress. Getting regular physical activity,  Regular exercise can lift your mood and serve as a distraction from worries, allowing you to break out of the cycle of negative thoughts that feed stress, exercises such as walking, running, swimming, and dancing are particularly effective, especially if you exercise mindfully, Practicing relaxation techniques, such as deep breathing, meditation, yoga, Spending time with family and friends or religious organizations, Setting aside time for hobbies, such as reading a book or listening to music, always keep a positive attitude, Get enough rest and sleep. Your body needs time to recover from stressful events, don’t rely on alcohol, drugs, or compulsive behaviors to reduce stress and eat healthy, well-balanced meals.

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